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Muscovite mica thin section by Shirimasen Muscovite mica thin section by Shirimasen
Muscovite mica thin section in cross-polarized light. Field of view is about 0.25mm.

Science!

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:iconbulman66:
Bulman66 Featured By Owner May 27, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Beautiful John. I love Geology, minerals, stones, gems, fossils
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:iconshirimasen:
Shirimasen Featured By Owner May 28, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
I'm a geologist by trade, so I appreciate your kind words. :]
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:iconmclawliet:
Mclawliet Featured By Owner May 10, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
I've noticed that these magnified pictures are relatively new in your gallery (judging by the date of posting). I like that you've moved a bit away from black and white photos (even though they have their own charm that colors cannot produce), and would love to see more of these (yes, imma color enthusiast :D)!
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:iconshirimasen:
Shirimasen Featured By Owner May 11, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Aw, thanks! The really old stuff (before December 2011) was all stuff from my high school photography class, many moons ago. The move into color earlier this year represents moving away from my B&W comfort zone. I appreciate the kind words. :]
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:iconmagpie-poet:
magpie-poet Featured By Owner Mar 31, 2012
How did you do that?!
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:iconshirimasen:
Shirimasen Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Shortish explanation: The microscope has two pieces of polarizing film, one at the bottom and one at the top of the microscope. The bottom polarizing film makes the light rays go all in one direction. They then pass through the mineral and get bent in various directions. The light then passes through the top polarizing film, which only lets certain wavelengths of light through. Finally, the light reaches your eye. All minerals have unique ways that light passes through them, and allow for identification under a microscope.

tl;dr: A microscope did it and I just took a picture of it. :]
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:iconmagpie-poet:
magpie-poet Featured By Owner Apr 6, 2012
Okay, think I got it.

Sort of like looking at the spectrum banding of starlight to see the star's composition.
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:iconshirimasen:
Shirimasen Featured By Owner Apr 6, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Yeah, that's the general idea, but it's much closer. :]
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:iconmagpie-poet:
magpie-poet Featured By Owner Apr 6, 2012
:p The closest I've gotten is the ooh let's burn mystery substance X to figure out what elements are in in from high school chem class.
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:iconshirimasen:
Shirimasen Featured By Owner Apr 6, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Well, it's a fine demonstration to show how substances emit/absorb light, which is the basic idea with polarized microscopy. :]
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:iconmagpie-poet:
magpie-poet Featured By Owner Apr 6, 2012
And lots of fun :D
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:iconthanksthatisenough:
thanksthatisenough Featured By Owner Mar 24, 2012
wow so beautiful -
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:iconshirimasen:
Shirimasen Featured By Owner Mar 25, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Thank you! :]
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:iconthanksthatisenough:
thanksthatisenough Featured By Owner Mar 26, 2012
So welcome
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:icontranscendelia:
transcendelia Featured By Owner Mar 10, 2012
wow that's so cool!
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:iconshirimasen:
Shirimasen Featured By Owner Mar 11, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Thanks! I love microscopy. :]
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:iconfmr0:
fmr0 Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2012
The reflective properties of the Muscovite mica are also used to make what is often called "bronze" , "metal" or "interference" etc.... pigments or artists colours, in the field of artist supplies.......

splendid shot! :D
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:iconshirimasen:
Shirimasen Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Ooooh, I was not aware of that! I knew of its uses in industry (industrial lubricant, drywall) and historically (in windows in Moscow, hence the name), but that's a new one! I'll remember that the next time I teach intro to geology, since I usually have a few art majors.
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:icontrinitite:
Trinitite Featured By Owner Mar 1, 2012  Student General Artist
The iridescent qualities on that are beautiful, I didn't know mica could turn those colors!
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:iconshirimasen:
Shirimasen Featured By Owner Mar 4, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
It's not quite "natural" in that this photomicrograph is at the muscovite through cross-polarized light -- in hand sample, it looks like a normal mica! This is just one of the awesome things about microscopy.
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:iconheleanor1:
Heleanor1 Featured By Owner Feb 29, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
High order interference colours - don'tcha just love nature!


Lovely photomicroraph... do you remember where the specimen was from?


Be Seeing You
H
Currently Just Poked Her Eye Out Peering Down The Microscope
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:iconshirimasen:
Shirimasen Featured By Owner Feb 29, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Ah, that's the $100,000 question. This was actually a sample that I was assigned for an optical mineralogy class. So unlike the other thin sections I have up here, I am not sure of the provenance. Sorry! It is quite nice though, innit?
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:iconjimbillsverige:
JimBillSverige Featured By Owner Feb 6, 2012
Wow, beautiful colours! Nice photo! :]
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:iconshirimasen:
Shirimasen Featured By Owner Feb 7, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Thank you! I wish I had more to do with it, but nature is the true artist here. :]
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:iconteaphotography:
TeaPhotography Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2012  Professional General Artist
The colours are great, this turned out awesomely! :w00t:
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:iconshirimasen:
Shirimasen Featured By Owner Jan 30, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Thanks! I wish I could take credit for the colors, but that's just how they look naturally in a polarized microscope! Yay optics!
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:iconfuyu-no-sakura:
Fuyu-no-sakura Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
lovely birds-eyes effect you caught there
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:iconshirimasen:
Shirimasen Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Thanks! It turned out to be a lovely thin section.
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January 20, 2012
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